ISSUES FACING RANCHO CUCAMONGA

 

Rancho Cucamonga incorporated in 1977 with a vision to bring careful planning and controlled growth to the area. Residents and businesses were attracted to the developing region which had a rural feel, provided by wide open spaces, equestrian trails, and a history of agriculture and wine-making. Beautiful landscaped areas, parks, and award winning schools helped make Rancho Cucamonga a desirable place to live and work.

 

Today, those open spaces have been developed and Rancho Cucamonga faces many challenges to the quality of life enjoyed throughout our expansion. Now, the urbanization of Rancho Cucamonga brings continued high density development with congestion, traffic, and crowded schools. Increased population density generates higher crime rates. Landscaping and park maintenance have been restricted, youth sport teams have difficulty finding playing space, and after 30 years, Central Park is still not a park.

LOCAL CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM

 

Campaign contribution limits are a way to help prevent corruption or the appearance of corruption inherent in a system permitting unlimited financial contributions.  Campaign contribution limits help to ensure that candidates are not overly reliant on a few wealthy donors or committees to finance their campaigns. With a cap on individual contributions, candidates must also build a broader base of support to be viable.

In California, there is no state limit on campaign contributions to candidates for local office. State law allows cities to adopt their own contribution limits by resolution or ordinance. Over 100 cities in California have adopted local campaign contribution limits. Rancho Cucamonga is not one of them.

In his campaign for Mayor of Rancho Cucamonga, Mark Gibboney has voluntarily set a contribution limit from any individual, business, or committee, of $2,500 and  invites all the candidates for Mayor and City Council to do the same and if elected, to support the enactment of a city ordinance setting campaign contribution limits and disclosure requirements for independent expenditures.  If all candidates voluntarily accept contribution limits, a Iower limit is suggested.

GOALS

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MAINTAIN THE PLAN!

 

Return to careful planning and controlled growth. Stop high density development.

PUBLIC SAFETY AND SECURITY

 

Partner with law enforcement and the community to address crime issues.

RANCHO CUCAMONGA IS NOT FOR SALE

 

Institute local campaign finance reform. Limit contributions as done with county, state, and federal candidates.

Rancho Cucamonga is a desirable place to live and work that many of us have come to love, but we face challenges to our quality of life and we can do better. Mark Gibboney will work for you.  We need you to join our grass roots effort to send Mark to City Hall to work for us!  There's many ways you can help.

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